The Deadly Politics of Giving – Dr. Seth Mallios Interview

2020 marks the 450th anniversary of the ill-fated Spanish Jesuit Ajacan Mission. Discussing this topic and a key ingredient to Ajacan’s downfall is Dr. Seth Mallios, who wrote The Deadly Politics of Giving: Exchange and Violence at Ajacan, Roanoke, and Jamestown in 2006. The key ingredient leading to Ajacan’s fate, Mallios argues, is gift giving, or better stated, how the Spanish did not understand how gift giving was properly used in indigenous society. Because of this lack of understanding, when the Spanish returned to establish Ajacan in 1570 the mission quickly and violently ended.

Dr. Mallios then ventures into Roanoke and Jamestown with the same focus, how did gift giving affect those colonies? Tune in to this episode to find out the answer to this and other questions that Seth and I discuss, such as whether or not the Ajacan Jesuit missionaries were martyrs and differences between how European and Indigenous societies viewed transactions.

LINKS TO THE PODCAST:

BOOKS BY SETH MALLIOS:

  1. The Deadly Politics of Giving: Exchange and Violence at Ajacan, Roanoke, and Jamestown. Tuscaloosa AL: University of Alabama, 2006.
  2. Born a Slave, Died a Pioneer: Nathan “Nate” Harrison and the Historical Archaeology of a Legend. New York: Berghahn, 2020.
  3. With Caterino, David M. Cemeteries of San Diego. Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2007.
  4. With Caterino, David M. Cemeteries of San Diego County. Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2008.
  5. Hail Montezuma! The Hidden Treasures of San Diego State. San Diego: Montezuma Publishing, 2012.
  6. An Interim Technical Report for the 2017 Field Season: Archaeological Excavations at the Nate Harrison Site in San Diego County, CA.San Diego: Montezuma Publishing, 2018.
  7. With Lennox, Jaime. Let it Rock! Live from San Diego State, 5 Volumes. San Diego: Montezuma Publishing, 2015

Links to Dr. Mallios:

Don Luis decapitating the Jesuit Missionaries at Ajacan

All photography on this website is owned and copyrighted by the author unless otherwise noted. The featured image is of Dr. Seth Mallios from the dailyaztec.com. The image of Don Luis decapitating the Ajacan Jesuits can be found at virginiaplaces.org.

Music used for this episode – Louis Armstrong and the Mills Brothers,”Carry Me Back to Old Virginia” available on Apple Music, and “”Simple Gifts” performed by the New York Philharmonic, also available on Apple Music.

Scott Dawson and the “Lost Colony Mystery”

There are fewer, more captivating American History mysteries than the “Lost Colony Mystery.” But is it in fact a mystery? Generations of Hatteras Island natives have claimed that there was no mystery to begin with. They had always known where the “Lost Colonists” of Roanoke Island went. They went to Croatoan, that is, they went to Hatteras.

Local Hatteras historian/archaeologist Scott Dawson grew up hearing the stories, and decided that he had to know what the primary source documents said about the story. After reading these sources, Scott became convinced that the colonists had in fact done what generations of Hatteras natives said the colonists had done. They moved southward.

In this episode, Dawson retells his story. That story is an adventure through Roanoke’s true history, Scott’s initial search throughout the Island, and archaeological discoveries. Tune in, and then for more, check out the Croatoan Archaeological Society’s website. Finally, don’t forget to get Scott’s book. It tells this episode’s story in more detail that you won’t want to miss.

Hatteras Island jutting out into the Atlantic

LINKS TO THE PODCAST:

LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:

  1. Dawson, Scott. The Lost Colony and Hatteras Island. Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2020.
  2. Hampton, Jeff. “Lost Colony of Roanoke: Researchers Say They Know What Happened to the Lost Colony.” – The Virginian Pilot, August 2020.
  3. Lawler, Andrew. “The Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke” – National Geographic, June 2018.
  4. Lawler, Andrew. “We Finally Have Clues to How the Lost Roanoke Colony Vanished” – National Geographic, August, 2015.
  5. Croatoan Archaeological Society

 

 

 

 

All photography used on this site is owned and copyrighted by the author unless otherwise noted. The Featured Image is of Scott Dawson and his new book, found on amazon.com. The Hatteras Island Image is from wikipedia.com

Music used for this episode – Louis Armstrong and the Mills Brothers,”Carry Me Back to Old Virginia” available on Apple Music, and Valse Triste, Op. 44 by Jean Sibelius, performed by the Berlin Philharmonic & Helsinki Radio Symphony Orchestra, Conducted by Herbert von Karajan, also available on Apple Music.